The Saltlist

Satire in the Age of Letters and Technology- more than just a pinch of it.

Holi and its different faces: Don’t go colourblind!

By: Shivani Singh and Aarushi Jain

 

 

 

THE GOOD:

The month of colors, the month of celebration, the month of joy is here. Its time for us to bid adieu to the freezing winters and welcome the bright sun to bestow its vibrant rays upon us. Holi, famously known as the festival of colours evokes so many memories. You say Holi and the enthusiasts cannot get enough of their stories of how much they love it how they waited and planned for it as kids and how the craving for sweets went to a different level altogether. Then we have the pessimists who go on and on about how the colours are harmful for one’s skin, how the thought of coloured water makes them whinge and how they have dreaded holi all their lives.


This is the most exciting time for kids as they get to gear themselves up with their plastic water guns, balloons filled with colored water, powder in the brightest of hues and of course hands and pockets full of the delectable ghujia (A sweet dumpling made of maida flour and khoya if Wikipedia is to be believed). Wikipedia will never know what a delicacy ghujia is for all the sweet devotees. The 90s kids know the steel water guns or in our words, the pichkaari which were always better and sturdier than the plastic, advanced versions which came in with China’s entry into the holi market. The undying enthusiasm for holi, the desire to get drenched in colours, to have the permanent colour staying on you for weeks defines the devotion for it.
For those of us blessed with the gift of sight, colours will continue to be significant as we attach a certain meaning to every colour, they can excite us, generate fear or happiness or heal and rejuvenate us in a way nothing can. Holi is one festival that will take you for a colourful ride, it boosts your energy in a way no health drink can. The liveliness it fills you with by virtue of all those colors is impossible to run away from.
And as the great Anu Malik’s song goes ‘Do me a favour! Let’s play holi’
-Shivani


THE BAD:

Every year, on a full moon night in early March, the festival of colours, Holi, is celebrated with fervour. But for the past few years, the value of the festival has evidently degraded.
Lately, Holi has begun to be associated with hooliganism. The smearing of not only coloured powder but also grease, varnish and paints on people’s faces who do not like playing it by merely saying, “bura na maano, Holi hai!” (Do not mind, its Holi!), the pelting of water balloons on passers by, the dunking of people into filth- all of it and much worse is becoming a part of the Holi culture. During a lot of these Holi parties, people (especially the males) tend to drink a lot and can be spotted misbehaving with others. There have been cases when boys start looking for the right moment to grab a chance to paint the girls present in the name of having ‘fun’. Sometimes even girls are seen to coquette the opposite sex by virtue of their deceptive looks. These may affect or make the others present uncomfortable.


In 2006, the Commissioner of Police – Delhi, passed an order which said that throwing of coloured water, rubber balloons containing water and applying of colour or gulal on any unwilling person is prohibited. The balloon being sold should not exceed more than two inches in size when deflated, said the order. Besides this, the order states, nothing should be done to cause annoyance to the public or danger to life or disturbance of public tranquility. Violators are subject to punishment under Section 188 of the Indian Penal Code.
We respect the fact that Holi should be celebrated with much enthusiasm and spirit for the ones who enjoy it. But it is equally important to respect the interests of those people who do not construe Holi as their cup of tea, or their cup of bhaang in this case.
-Aarushi

We at The Saltlist urge you to watch this video and reflect upon it:

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4 comments on “Holi and its different faces: Don’t go colourblind!

  1. i might not be humorous!
    March 8, 2012

    both of you did a great work, really enjoyed reading it. 🙂

  2. Aarushi Jain
    March 8, 2012

    We appreciate your feedback, thank you! 🙂

  3. Mannoj Thakur
    March 9, 2012

    Admirably thorough in their journalistic skill-sets,the duo Shivani and Aarushi, has penned an awesome article ! Your exuberant word play left the audience overwhelmed with awe and wonder and delight !! Great !!!

  4. Shivani
    March 9, 2012

    Thank you ! 🙂
    Your words of appreciation mean a lot to us and they have been expressed beautifully.We are glad you liked reading it.
    Keep reading! 🙂

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This entry was posted on March 8, 2012 by in Democracy, Governance and Human Interest, Events and tagged , .

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